CCUS Institute POCUS & Resuscitationist Mini-Fellowship: Evolution.

 

So over the last couple of years, the POCUS Mini-Fellowships have been slowly but steadily morphing into POCUS-Resus training.  With POCUS essentially critical in all aspects in resus, including venous congestion assessment, ventilation, diagnostics, it is a natural extension to blend the exchange into many of the other tools that we use, including discussions around fluids choices, pressor choices, monitoring using NIRS tissue oximetry, ETCO2, and overall resuscitation strategies.

Some structured workshops will include percutaneous pigtail insertion, vascular access phantom practice and both surgical and percutaneous surgical airway manikin practice, depending on participants’ choice.

We have recently expanded with the addition of Dr. Philippe St-Arnaud, ER and CC doc and EDE (Emergency Department Echography) Instructor extraordinaire, who will increase our availability – which had been fairly limited – apologies to those whom we could not accommodate due to scheduling reasons.

This is an excellent complement to an RLA (I’m part of that faculty) or ULA fellowship, to bring a real clinical experience into the mix.

Of course, if you are a canadian resident you can get a whole month of this for free by doing an ICU elective at Santa Cabrini Hospital (well, americans are also welcome but more hoops to jump thru!).

For more details and registration information see here.

And here is some of the most recent feedback from the fellows:

 

        This review is for the CCUS Institute Bedside Ultrasound (US) Mini-Fellowship. I was fortunate to do the mini-fellowship after the Hospitalist & Resuscitationist conference, and I was able to put into practice various techniques that we learned. Dr. Rola was a pleasure to work with and was well-versed with the latest US and free online access meducation (FOAM). The atmosphere was conducive to learning, and we picked up an ultrasound almost immediately and used it extensively through each day. We used various US machines and were able to get a good feel for all of them. My US experience before the mini-fellowship had been a two-day introductory course with healthy medical students as volunteers. At the mini-fellowship, being able to learn on actual critically ill patients was illuminating and helped cement what I had learned. We also went over relatively new bedside techniques such as point-of-care trans-cranial doppler (TCD) and optic nerve US (ONSD). Overall, the experience was well worth the 2800 mile trip, and I would enthusiastically recommend it to anyone that is interested in learning practical applications of US. – Dr. Pranay Parikh, Los Angeles, USA.

So join us for a few days of intense, real clinical learning.

cheers,

 

Philippe

Resuscitation Leadership Academy: Check it out!

 

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Just wanted to invite everyone to take a look at the Resuscitation Leadership Academy (www.resuscitationleadership academy), brainchild of Haney Mallemat (@criticalcarenow) and Scott Weingart (@emcrit), neither of whom need an intro at this point, needless to say.  Much thanks to them for inviting me to the faculty, very honoured to be a part of the team!

Basically the RLA offers an online curriculum packed with great material, but more importantly the opportunity to do an online hangout with any faculty member and discuss cases, topics, etc, in an informal but very informative manner. I think this is a great resource for trainees as well as those who are in practice but either lack an academic environment or really just want to tap into some of these guys’ experience and knowledge.

Looking forward to meeting some of you in a hangout!

cheers

Philippe