H&R2019 Preliminary Programme!

 

So things are coming together really nicely. With a couple of attendees from last year becoming speakers, and the addition of some local talent, we’re back for another run. A bit bigger, yes, but not so big that the informal and inclusive atmosphere is lost. In order to really add some more in-depth, take-home skills, we have added the pre-congress courses (see here for more detail) which are truly awesome and will have participants leave with some very concrete and usable clinical skills.

Now there will be a few more additions to the programme, but this should give everyone a pretty good idea of what they are signing up for:

H&R2019 Preliminary Program

One of the things we are really striving to do is to tie things in together. For those of you who followed the posts on venous congestion, or on MAP and perfusion, everyone involved, Rory (@EMnerd), Josh (@Pulmcrit), Jon (@heart_lung), Segun (@iceman_ex), Korbin and the rest of us will be working to crystallize concepts and clinical applications in the huge grey zone that is acute resuscitation.  I am particularly interested in Felipe Teran’s (@FTeranMD) discussions on arrest physiology, because, as opposed to theory-based protocols and guidelines, guys like Felipe are using real-time physiology to guide resuscitation. As far as I’m concerned we all need to move towards this type of resuscitology as opposed to the blind recipe approach.

The workshops will be really cool. In the Castlefest-style, participants will be able to focus on the ones they really want to work on, or else give all of them a try. And there should be some pretty unique ones, such as portal and hepatic doppler, renovascular POCUS as well as a REBOA and ECMO workshops.

We should have registration up and running by november first. There is a 100 participant limit, so don’t wait too long, as we sold out last year!

Montrreal, May 22nd to 24th!

If you’ve got questions, please email hospresusconference@gmail.com or leave a comment!

cheers!

 

Philippe

H&R2019 Pre-Conference Courses. May 22nd. Yup, it’s worth coming early!

So we are very, very excited about our pre-conference course lineup. It is simply awesome:

1. Full day Resuscitative TEE (Limited to 20 participants) 0830-1730

2. Full day Keynotable 0830-1730

3. Half day Hospitalist POCUS (Limited to 30 participants) afternoon 1330-1730

4. Half day Critical Care Procedures (Limited to 20 participants) morning 0830-1230

5 .Half day Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for MDs (Limited to 30 participants) morning 0900-1200.

 

Note that sadly, you have to make some choices. No way to attend it all…

 

So here is some info to help you make your best pick:

 

1. Full day Resuscitative TEE: run by none other than Felipe Teran, and featuring Andre Denault as head instructor, this is a unique opportunity for a deep dive into everything about TEE in arrest as well as extensive hands-on training on arrest TEE using state-of-the-art simulators. Participants will receive certification upon successful completion of ten supervised exams.

Limited to 20 participants. 795$USD. Register at

TEE Day PROGRAM

Flyer

 

Keynotable Motreal Flyer

2. Full day Keynotable: the brainchild of educator extraordinaire Haney Mallemat, this course is intended for those who want to add some serious game to their presentations and didactic teaching. Sharing tips and pearls that have made him unquestionably one of the best docs to man the stage and podium, this is a rare opportunity not only to leave run-of-the-mill powerpoints behind, but also to enhance your future audience’s learning and become a master presenter.

Registration 495$USD physicians, 375$USD trainees and other health care professionals. Register at http://www.keynotable.net or email info@keynotable.net.

More details here.

 

3. Half-Day Hospitalist POCUS: Learn absolutely necessary skills for the day-to-day management of your hospitalized patients. It doesn’t matter how good a clinician you are, with ultrasound you will be a better one. Learn from a world-class clinician faculty how to assess the IVC for a number of clinical scenarios, how to assess lungs, do basic cardiac views, diagnose or rule out hydronephrosis, and safely tap ascites or pleural effusions.

Cutting edge today, standard of care tomorrow…

Faculty: Rola, Ajmo, Haycock, Baker, Olusanya

Practice on state-of-the-art simulators, normal volunteers and volunteer patients with true pathology.

Your patients need you to know this.

Limited to 30 participants so that your hands on and faculty experience is maximized. 300$CAN/250$USD

 

4. Half-Day Critical Care Procedures: If you are not already familiar with these key procedures any resuscitationist should have in their pocket, don’t miss this course. We’ll go over thoracic pigtail insertion, bedside percutaneous tracheostomy and emergency surgical airway, using manikins and natural simulators. Plenty of practice, until you’re comfortable with the techniques. By the end of this activity, participants should be able to independently insert pigtail catheters and perform an emergency surgical airway, and be able to perform a percutaneous tracheostomy with the backup and supervision of an experienced operator.

Faculty:  Ajmo, Farkas, Tremblay

Limited to only 20 participants, so don’t wait too long! 300$CAN / 250$USD

 

 

 

5. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for MDs: Nope, you didn’t accidentally click on a link. This is part of the pre-conference day. What does it have to do with medicine? A lot. With life? Everything. If you’re already got mad mat skills, come join us for a couple hours of fun. If not, treat yourself to an introduction into a martial art, a sport and even a lifestyle that cultivates physical and mental health like no others. The rest of the conference will change your practice, but this workshop might change your life.

Faculty: Spiegel, Rola, and some guest stars!

No experience necessary, only interest and enthusiasm.

It’s a bit too early to be sure who, but expect to have some interesting surprises as to who your instructors might be…

…oh, and acute care docs should find something in the words of Rickson Gracie, one of the legends of jiu-jitsu:

Limited to 30 participants, registration fee TBA, and will open on november 1st. You can reserve your spot in the meantime by emailing hospresusconference@gmail.com.

 

So we are really looking forward to these courses. It’s a great opportunity to pick up some important skills and have plenty of time with some awesome instructors, all of whom are hoping to share as much clinical knowledge as possible.

Mark your calendars! Please email hospresusconference@gmail.com with any questions!

Hope to see you there!

 

The H&R Scientific Committee – St-Arnaud / Zambrana / Rola

A Primer on Pigtail insertion. #FOAMed, #FOAMcc

So I recorded this for our incoming residents to Santa Cabrini ICU, whom we expect to become well versed in this procedure by the end of their rotation with us. The difference between a smooth and simple insertion – best for both patient and operator, is in the little details.

Figured I might as well put it up on #FOAMed in case anyone else may benefit!

Here is the podcast:

 

And here is a video displaying the technique.

 

cheers

 

Philippe

 

 

Shock Macro and Micro-circulation: Piecing things together. (Part 1) #FOAMed, #FOAMcc

 

So I have really, really enjoyed the discussions I had with these bright people on shock circulation:

Segun Olusanya (@iceman_ex) Resus Track 2

Rory Spiegel (@EMnerd) Resus Track 3

Korbin Haycock (tell him to get on twitter) Resus Track 4

Jon Emile (@heart-lung)  Resus Track 5

 

Some take home points so far:

I think that more questions than answers truthfully came out of this, and that is really the best part. But lets see what the common agreed upon thoughts were:

a. the relationship between the MAP and tissue perfusion it quite complex, and definitely not linear. So scrap that idea that more MAP is more perfusion. Could be more, same, or less…

b. you can definitely over-vasoconstrict with vasopressors such that a increasing MAP, at some point, can decrease tissue perfusion. Clinically, we have all seen this.

c. no matter what you are doing theorizing about physiology and resuscitation, THE MOST IMPORTANT IS TO CONTROL THE SOURCE!

 

Some of the interesting possibilities:

a. Korbin sometimes sees decreasing renal resistive indices with resuscitation, particularly with the addition of vasopressin.

b. the Pmsa – can this be used to assess our stressed volume and affect our fluid/vasopressor balance?

c. trending the end-diastolic velocity as a surrogate for the Pcc and trending the effect of hemodynamic interventions on tissue perfusion.

This stuff is fascinating, as we have essentially no bedside ability to track and measure perfusion at the tissue level. This is definitely a space to watch, and we’ll be digging further into this topic.

 

Jon-Emile added a really good clinical breakdown:

I think one way to think of it is by an example. Imagine 3 patient’s MAPs are 55 mmHg. You start or increase the norepi dose. You could have three different responses as you interrogate the renal artery with quantitative Doppler:

patient 1: MAP increases to 65 mmHg, and renal artery end-diastolic velocity drops from 30 cm/s to 15 cm/s
patient 2: MAP increases to 65 mmHg and renal artery end-diastolic velocity remains unchanged.
patient 3: MAP increases to 65 mmHg and renal artery EDV rises from 10 cm/s to 25 cm/s

in the first situation, you are probably raising the critical closing pressure [i know i kept saying collapse in the recording] relative to the MAP. the pressure gradient falls and therefore velocity falls at end diastole. one would also expect flow to fall in this case, if you did VTI and calculated area of renal artery. in this situation you are raising arteriolar pressure, but primarily by constriction of downstream vessels and perfusion may be impaired. ***the effects on GFR are complicated and would depend on relative afferent versus efferent constriction***

in the second situation, you have raised MAP, and probably not changed the closing pressure because the velocity at the end of diastole is the same. if you look at figure 2 in the paper linked to above, you can see that increasing *flow* to the arterioles will increase MAP relative to the Pcc [closing pressure]. the increase in flow raises the volume of the arteriole which [as a function of arteriolar compliance] increases the pressure without changing the downstream resistance. increasing flow could be from beta-effects on the heart, or increased venous return from NE effects on the venous side activating the starling mechanism. another mechanism to increase flow and therefore arteriolar pressure relative to the closing pressure is the provision of IV fluids.

in the third situation, MAP rises, and EDV rises which suggests that the closing pressure has also fallen – thus the gradient from MAP to closing pressure rises throughout the cycle. how might this happen? its possible that raising the MAP decreases stimulus for renin release in afferent arteriole, less renin leads to less angiotensin and less efferent constriction. thus, paradoxically, the closing pressure falls with NE! another possibility is opening shunts between afferent and efferent arterioles [per Bellomo]. as above ***the effects on GFR are complicated and would depend on relative afferent versus efferent resistance changes***

 

This is really, really interesting stuff. So in theory, the MAP-Pcc gradient would be proportional to flow, so if we can estimate the direction of this gradient in response to our interventions, we may be able to decrease iatrogenism. I’ll have to discuss with Jon and Korbin which arterial level we should be ideally interrogating…

More to come, and next up will be Josh Farkas (@Pulmcrit), and I’m sure anyone following this discussion is looking forward to what he has to say. I know I am.

cheers!

 

Philippe

The Resus Tracks 05: Kenny (@heart_lung) Tackles Shock Perfusion! #FOAMed, #FOAMcc, #FOAMus

So finally got around to corralling Physiology Jedi Master Jon-Emile Kenny for a chat, which is always a tremendous learning opportunity. And this time was no different. Jon breaks down some of the mysteries around arteriolo-capillary coupling and shock flow, and brings up some really interesting potential uses of the critical collapse pressure of small arterioles, and hints at how we may be able to use some POCUS techniques to clinically assess tissue perfusion.

Here you go:

Please leave comments and questions!

The article we refer in the beginning to is here:

MAP in sepsis review

And the article on critical closing pressure in the neurocirculation that Jon refers to is here:

CrCP Brain

cheers!

 

Philippe

The Resus Tracks 03 – Shock Circulation with @EMnerd! #FOAMed, #FOAMcc, #FOAMer

Here we go!

 

Discussing with Rory is always awesome, because he manages to distill things to the most important stuff. In this one he basically says sure Phil, it’s fun to think up all kinds of semi-theoretico-imaginary hemodynamic stuff, but you gotta make sure you control the source!

Thanks!

 

Love to hear comments and criticisms!

 

Philippe

 

Here is the open access paper I was talking about, graph on page 2.

MAP in sepsis review

 

H&R2019. A bit Bigger. A LOT Better! #HR2019

First of all thanks to all of last April’s participants and faculty who made this an awesome event. For those of you who missed the inaugural event, no worries, this edition will be even better. Building on the feedback, we’re cooking up a really nice little program that will keep H&R small, packed with clinically useful talks and both cutting and bleeding edge lectures (don’t expect guideline rehash!), and even more faculty interaction.

We will have some parallel tracks to make sure the ED people get some more ER-specific stuff, that the CC people get some esoteric tweaks about obscure ICU topics, and the hospitalists and pick and choose.

We’ve added a pre-conference course day packed with great stuff. The real problem will be choosing:

Felipe Teran (@FTeranMD) brings us a full day, resuscitative TEE workshop including basic certification – first time in Canada!

For educators and anyone wanting to up their presentation game, my good friend Haney Mallemat (@CriticalCareNow) brings his unique Keynotable workshop. If you’ve ever heard Haney talk, you know he is the leader of the pack when it comes to delivery, so not-to-miss opportunity to learn form the master.

Hospitalist POCUS? Check. Hospitalist procedures? Check. Percutaneous tracheostomy and emergency surgical airway? Check. Advanced POCUS like renovascular and transcranial doppler? Check. And a lot more…

Basic info:

May 22nd – pre-conference courses

May 23rd – The Hospitalist

May 24th – The Resuscitationist

Preliminary programme available October 1st here.

 

So mark your calendars. Bring the fam, check out Montreal, and pack in a bunch of solid, ready-to-use clinical knowledge but also some paradigm-shifting approaches and viewpoints!

 

cheers!

 

Philippe